The bomb that killed Wayne Greavette (2009)

Awards

gemini-award-white2010 Gemini Nomination
Barbara Sears Award for Best Editorial Research 
2010 Gemini Nomination
Best News Magazine Segment

Case Summary:

Wayne Greavette opened what seemed like an early Christmas present on December 12th, 1996. The package contained a bomb that was disguised as a flashlight and when he turned it on, it exploded, killing him instantly. A letter that accompanied the bomb contained the names of some people Wayne knew along with a fake business proposal and return address. To date, the case is unsolved. At the time of his murder, Wayne and his family were developing a spring water business near Moffat, Ontario. Wayne’s widow Diane, and his two children Justin and Danielle have been tormented and consumed by the murder for thirteen years. In this program they confront the case together for the first time in an emotional and personal investigation of Wayne’s turbulent business past and secret private life. Take a front row seat as the Greavettes and filmmaker David Ridgen, examine one of the country’s most coldly horrifying murders and bring to light potentially important new evidence in the case.

Series background:

Canadian Cold Case is a story and character-driven revisiting of modern-era unsolved crimes involving Canadians from across the country. In each program, filmmaker David Ridgen works collaboratively with victim’s family members and others to return to crime scenes and hear the stories and voices of cases told through the eyes of those most closely connected to them. Programs will provide the opportunity to re-investigate tips and other avenues with the potential to generate new information that could, through the process, potentially re-energize cases.

Airdate: Friday December 11, 2009 CBC Radio’s The Current @ 8:30 AM (The Current)
CBC TV’s The National @ 10 PM on the Main CBC Network (The National)

Unsolvedcanada.com: file.

  

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Writer/Director/Camera/Editor
David Ridgen

(HD, 27 min., 2009 © CBC)

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